Bacon and Beer Fest 2012: Probably Not Going Again

April 29, 2012 at 11:47 PM (Events, Food) (, , )

Yesterday was what was supposed to be one of the happiest days of the year – right up there with my birthday, Christmas and the first day that Oktoberfests hit the shelves – EAT’s Bacon and Beer Festival 2012. I was lucky enough to attend last year, and it had been about three hours of pure bliss, filled with bacon-inspired dishes from some of Boston’s greatest eateries and some uncommon beers from local breweries. Brittany, meet your element. This year, I wish I could hold that same enthusiasm.

While both concept and goal (benefiting local hunger relief organizations Lovin’ Spoonfuls and Community Servings) remained unchanged, two deal-breaking details did: attendance and venue. I anticipated that there would be crowds and lines. I did not anticipate so much of both that the overall experience would suffer. After 45 minutes of waiting in line to get in to House of Blues, my foodie friend and I were eager to make our way to the first station. If only we could find it: it was hard to tell with all the other attendees trying to figure out what was a line and what was just a mess of people. Earlier in the day I had entertained dreams of taking pictures of every station so I’d be able to blog about my favourites later. I now look back at that dream and have to laugh at my ignorant optimism. Half the time I was lucky when I realized what I was even waiting in line for.

While downstairs was a train wreck, upstairs was nothing short of a death wish (and at least 10 degrees hotter), with masses of people crammed along the walls trying to score some bacon, beer or fresh air. I wouldn’t describe myself as claustrophobic, but there had to be some break in fire code, if nothing else – wouldn’t that stress you out?

I was tolerant for a while until I learned of an offense even greater than fire code violation: exhaustion of provisions. Not even halfway into the event, and already at least three (that I knew of, maybe more) vendors were out of bacon. Unacceptable. There was plenty of bacon ice cream, but tough noogies if you wanted meatballs, beer-zpacho or nachos. Bacon ice cream was a cool idea the first time. Afterward, it just got annoying (especially if you didn’t realize you were waiting for it again). once I found out that food was disappearing, I didn’t stick around long afterward. I had experienced enough disillusionment for one day.

Last year had been hectic, but Royale had proven to be less of a death-trap venue-wise, and I don’t recall as many vendors packing up and leaving so early there, either. Like SXSW, the Bacon and Beer Fest may have become too popular for me to fully appreciate attending. Unless the venue changes and/or fewer people attend next year, you may be hard-pressed to find me among the masses.

Permalink Leave a Comment

Russell House Tavern and Brasserie JO on Social: “You’re Doing It Right!”

February 19, 2012 at 3:00 PM (Customer Service, Food) (, , , , , )

Newsflash: I love and live on food, and I love and live on social. I hope you were sitting down for that, because I know it’s shocking. So naturally when I find fantastic eateries who are using social media beyond just tweeting what the daily specials are on occasion, I try to make a point of going back… again, and again, and again.

You're doing it wrong failGiven my 160-character background, it’s a sad sight when I see one of my watering holes or favourite brands join Twitter or Facebook and not use it to interact with fans or followers, choosing instead to use social as another one-way push platform. Luckily, I know of two wonderful establishments who do no such thing. Ladies and gentlemen, give it up for Harvard Square’s Russell House Tavern and Back Bay’s Brasserie JO.

One of my first visits to Russell House Tavern (@RussellHouseTav) was a result of my having a little time to kill and having tweeted with their chef, Michael Scelfo, once or twice previously. As I’m wont to do, I checked in via Foursquare and probably tweeted something about the incredible breadth of the beer list to both RHT and Scelfo. After a brief back and forth on the Twitter Tubes, I had the privilege to meet the chef himself (and sample some delicious sea bass) in-person. I don’t know if it’s just me, but meeting the folks responsible for spoiling my palate has always been a thrill. I’ve only met a handful in Boston, and 1.) it makes me feel important and appreciated, and 2.) I just like knowing the personality that goes into a menu. I’m a people person. What do you expect?

Russell House Tavern downstairs bar Boston CambridgeScelfo is definitely the heart of RHT, but there’s much more that contributes to my love of the place: the layout, the atmosphere, the management, and the bar staff (I’m sure the waitstaff is also wonderful, but I’ve never dined away from the bar). On more recent visits, I’ve met the folks behind the Twitter handle (specifically Tyler Titherington – lovely meeting you!) and learned to trust the beer recommendations from bartenders Adam and Lou (you have to ask because the variety on the menu will, in fact, blow your mind).

I’ve also learned that you can’t lose with anything on the menu, having tried something new every visit and never being disappointed. Recent highlights: beef heart ravioli, burrata salad (the first time I ate my brussel sprouts!), bacon-wrapped paté, foie custard, and ox tongue meatballs. In short, Scelfo can do no wrong. This all said, I don’t think I ever would have visited unprompted if that online rapport wasn’t there, first. I’m not entirely a creature of habit, but I need a reason to try something new: a friend’s recommendation, an event, or even just an invitation to visit from a restaurant’s Twitter account – which leads me to my next social shout-out.

Brasserie JO (@brasseriejo) was actually the first restaurant I visited in Boston several years ago when I was still looking at colleges. Goodness, that was a while ago – so long ago that Twitter was still a lower-cased verb – but it was still a tasty experience (if you’re ever there for brunch, try the chocolate French toast). Fast-forward to when checking in on Foursquare is almost on par with breathing when it comes to my natural instincts. I had just done so at the Prudential Center (check in and, yes, continue breathing) when I received at at-reply from JO, suggesting that I stop in because it came @BostonTweet– and @eric_andersen-recommended – adding an #IWithThatWereTrue tag to signify the jest behind the latter end of the statement. I appreciated the chutzpah, and given that I didn’t have any concrete plans, I decided to oblige and swing in for a beer (and maybe some escargot).

After a few minutes at the bar and feeling a little cheeky, I tweeted back to them saying, “I’m here – where are you?” While whomever was responsible for the Twitter account wasn’t there, he or she did inform management that I was in the house, and I did get to meet some of the kitchen magic as well as one of the managers (sadly this was several months ago, so names have escaped me – this kudos is LONG overdue and I apologise). Oh, and I was also introduced to a divine charcuterie plate, but that relationship didn’t last long – relationships with fine cuisine rarely do.

Thanks to social, I’ve turned into one of those annoying consumers who gets cranky when brands on social don’t interact (see the beginning of this post). When a restaurant invites me in, and then rewards me for doing so, then yes, I’ll be more inclined to return. In fact, I’m pretty sure JO was the restaurant of choice during the following visit from the parentals – and again, one of the managers (I remember that time it was Annmarie Blythe) stopped by to say hello. “Getting a Twitter” just doesn’t cut it for B2C brands. Thankfully there are some great establishments in and around Boston who recognize that, and those of us who live online certainly aren’t going to ignore that when it comes time to make a purchasing decision.

Have you had an amazing experience with a local eatery, thanks to social? Let me know in the comments so I can check it out (let me know where the crappy experiences were so I can avoid those, too).

If You Go…

Russell House Tavern
14 JFK Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 500-3055
http://www.russellhousecambridge.com/

Brasserie JO
120 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 425-3240
http://www.brasseriejo.com/

Today’s Tunes
“Delicate,” Damien Rice
“Amie,” Damien Rice
“9 Crimes,” Damien Rice
“Dressed to Kill,” Landon Pigg

Permalink Leave a Comment

Winners from Beer Summit’s Winter Jubilee

January 22, 2012 at 7:13 PM (Events, Food, Happenings) (, , , , , , )

Yesterday was a magical day filled with lots and lots of beer, thanks to Beer Summit: Winter Jubilee. I’ve been to a couple summits in previous years and of course find new, interesting things at every one. The Jubilee, however, seemed to be a special treat: I have never had so many delicious beers at once. Great job, brewers! That said, a couple brews stood out that I’d like to share so that you can taste and enjoy, as well.

dark winter aleBrewery Ommegang Adoration If there was a “Best of Jubilee Award,” Adoration deserved it, hands down. I love Belgian dark strong ales, and – I can’t help myself here – I adored Adoration. It was the perfect beer to warm you up on a cold winter’s day, with the perfect blend of coriander, cumin, mace, cardamom and grains of paradise. Ales like Adoration make me tolerate all the crappiness that can accompany a New England winter.

Long Trail Double Bag I actually wouldn’t have gone to Long Trail’s booth had my friend not insisted we go. It’s not that I don’t like Long Trail – I’d just never had it and had other breweries I wanted to visit. But, not being one to turn down something new, I gave it a shot. Double Bag is another strong ale with a notable alcohol content (7.2 percent abv) that you don’t notice when you’re drinking it. Good for drinking at home without having any plans to go outside.

beer, Sam AdamsSamuel Adams Whitewater IPA The kids at Sam Adams hold a special place in my heart because the first beers I really started drinking were the Boston Lager and the Octoberfest. If you’re friends with me on Untappd, you’ll see that I still drink more Sam than anything else. It’s a brand loyalty thing. Anyhoo, back to Whitewater IPA. I’m actually not crazy about IPAs and usually lean toward maltier beers, but there were apricot notes that softened this beer enough for me to drink and even enjoy. Well done, Jim and co.

Staropramen Premium Lager Holy yummy, Batman. Owned by Spaten, who also makes my beloved Franziskaner and of course, Spaten Premium Lager, this is simply a very solid lager. Nicely balanced, it goes down easy and may be the lightest beer on this list (but don’t you dare confuse this with a light beer). In short, it’s just a bottle of satisfaction. I might even suggest it to my dad, the world’s pickiest beer drinker.

My only regret about Jubilee is that I didn’t make it to all the booths I wanted. I missed out on Notch, Backlash, Peak Organic and some other great breweries, but on the bright side I tried some new stuff, too. And really, isn’t that the best part of a beer summit?

Permalink Leave a Comment

Follow-up: Savored (Formerly Known as VillageVines) Now in Boston!

December 21, 2011 at 2:17 AM (Food, Uncategorized) (, , , , )

In June 2010 (I know, it seems like forever ago), I blogged about a company that I described as “Gilt for Restaurants,” at the time known as VillageVines, closing with the hope that the New York start-up would eventually come to Boston. In June 2011 (goodness, I have to get with the program here), my wish came true.

Along with a little re-branding, the artist formerly known as VillageVines, now Savored, is in Boston at last, currently offering insider pricing at 16 area restaurants. As a refresher, in case you don’t feel like reading my original post, Savored partners with restaurants to give diners solid discounts during off-peak times. In most cities, the discount is 30 percent, but due to Boston’s laws against discounting liquor, the discount is 40 percent on food only. After paying a $10 fee to reserve your table, just show up, remind your server you booked through Savored and enjoy your budget-friendlier meal. Pretty rad, right? Oh, and if your discount doesn’t cover the reservation fee, Savored refunds it for you. Win!

Restaurants Currently on Savored
Artbar
Blu Boston
Central Kitchen
Da Vinci Ristorante
Gran Gusto
Lumiere
Mantra
Mumbai Chopstix
Nubar
Skipjacks (Both Newton and Back Bay)
Temple Bar
Tomasso Trattoria & Entoteca
Tremont647
Woodward

Check it out and sign up. Or if you’ve already signed up, let me know what you think in the comments!

Permalink 2 Comments

A Belated, Albeit Still Current, Dismissal of Domino’s

November 22, 2011 at 7:00 AM (Customer Service, Food) (, , , )

Yesterday, I saw a tweet about Domino’s introducing their new gourmet cheesy bread to appeal to consumer palates that are “evolving to such tastes.” Won’t lie: if this were to have taken place a couple years ago, I probably would have been eager to try the spinach and feta, or even the supposed souped-up cheese-only upgrade. Instead, today I was only reminded of how long it’s been since I gave up on the chain forever and ever, following a fatal last straw. Curious? Read on.

I used to worship Domino’s cheesy bread. “Party in my mouth” was just one of many, many happy ways to describe how I felt about the carb-heavy, cheesy, garlicky calories. Oftentimes when I called for delivery, I’d only order the pizza so I’d meet the minimum charge required for delivery. Sometimes I didn’t even try to kid myself and just ordered two boxes of cheesy bread. Given that I was still dancing during most of my Domino’s era, I could afford to enjoy this diet and not grow to the size of a house. Yes, life at BU was good.

Then I moved deep into the heart of a Brookline neighborhood, no longer a stone’s throw from BU’s campus. And the Golden Age came to an end.

It was my first night in my current place, where I’ve resided for more than a year, now, and I had no internet, little furniture, and little to no interest in cooking my own dinner. I didn’t worry, however, knowing that approximately 35 minutes were all I’d need before I could enjoy some of my beloved cheesy bread. I called up my local Domino’s and placed my order. When they went to confirm my address, I corrected them with my latest place of residence.

“Oh, uh, we don’t deliver that far.”

“Okay, can you connect me to a store that does?”

“It doesn’t work like that. You have to look it up online.”

“Well, I don’t have internet access. Is there another number I can call to find out who does deliver to me?”

“You could call corporate…”

Fine. I was hungry and still determined to not cook. I called corporate, gave them my address, and took down the number they gave me. I hung up and dialed the number… to find myself back on the phone with the original location who claimed to not deliver to me.

“Hi, I’d like to place and order for delivery, please.”

(After taking my number and address) “I’m sorry, we don’t deliver to that address.”

“I just got off the phone with corporate, and they said you do.”

(A mildly uncomfortable pause) “Okay, well, it’s going to take us, like, 80 minutes.”

“That’s fine” (it wasn’t, but what was I going to do?).

I placed my order – cheesy bread (natch) and a small fancy-pants pizza that was being advertised at the time (tried to see if it still exists, but the Domino’s website wasn’t cooperating) – and sat back and waited. Sure enough, after an excruciatingly long hour and 20 minutes passed, I heard the buzzer. I paid the delivery person, took the boxes and skedaddled inside to feast. I shelved the pizza box, focusing my salivating attention on the smaller box, sure to contain my cheesy bread. I opened it, and –

Let’s take a moment. Do you remember that customer complaint letter to Sir Richard Branson of Virgin Airlines? Let me pull out a particular excerpt with which I identify all too easily, following the experience I’m recounting to you now:

Imagine being a twelve year old boy Richard. Now imagine it’s Christmas morning and you’re sat their with your final present to open. It’s a big one, and you know what it is. It’s that Goodmans stereo you picked out the catalogue and wrote to Santa about. Only you open the present and it’s not in there. It’s your hamster Richard. It’s your hamster in the box and it’s not breathing.

Buffalo chicken kickers. Buffalo [expletive]ing chicken kickers. After all that back-and-forth and waiting with bated breath, I had, in front of me, a box of food that I couldn’t even eat (buffalo wings are too spicy for my tender palate). To say I was livid would be polite. I called the store back immediately, as the delivery man had already gone, to demand a remedy to this outrage. After being asked what I wanted them to do about it (really?!), I said that I wanted a delivery of cheesy bread – and that I wanted the next cheesy bread purchase comped (this was not the first time my poor culinary delight had been forgotten). I was promised both, and once again I found myself sitting and waiting for my dinner.

Not 30 minutes later, I had company. Before letting the delivery guy go, I confirmed that he had indeed brought me cheesy bread. At last, somewhere between 10:00 and 11:00 p.m., after a long day of moving, I had my dinner. I opened the box, finally beginning to relax knowing that I could still get my fix.

Only the cheesy bread had been rushed through the oven: the top looked like it had barely been heated. Even my trophy for all my efforts was tarnished and I couldn’t enjoy that. I should have called to complain again, or at the very least written my own letter of complaint that would have made Sir Richard think that he had it easy, but I was too exhausted and hungry. Defeated, I sat in my apartment, alone, eating crappy cheesy bread – oh, and that pizza wasn’t great, either. I never ordered that comped cheesy bread. I was done. To this day I still refuse to order it.

So Domino’s, good luck with your new gourmet cheesy bread. Maybe I’ll hear how it turns out through one grapevine or another, because I sure won’t be ordering it – or anything else on the menu – for myself.

Permalink Leave a Comment

A Night of Delicious: Taste, from Boston Magazine

November 22, 2011 at 1:02 AM (Food, Happenings) (, , , )

Have I mentioned that I love the fruits borne to me by Twitter recently? No? Well… I love them. Most recently, I scored a pair of VIP tickets to Taste, “Boston’s premier tasting event,” brought to you by Boston magazine by way of a @BostonTweet freebie (woohoo!!). Given my love of almost all things edible, this was definitely something for me to salivate over. Last  Monday, I was lucky enough to sample bite-sized delights from 28 of Boston’s “hottest restaurants”* at the Museum of Science, and all I have to say is that I wish I was capable of eating more so that I could have stayed and enjoyed longer (being fun-sized does have its occasional disadvantages).

The munchables ranged from octopus to foi gras to borscht to frozen custard to bagels – no palate was left unsatisfied. I wish my phone battery hadn’t been drained at the event I attended earlier that evening, as educational as it was (thank you, PubClub), because it’s impossible for me to connect every noteworthy morsel to its respective restaurant, but at the very least, I can give you a list of the restaurants that participated in this fancy-pants event.

It’s okay to be green with envy. It was awesome. My only advice for next year’s event is to add high-top tables, because balancing a drink and a snack in a pair of heels is difficult without some assistance. Other than that, a pretty killer event, thanks to Boston magazine and for me, the magic of Twitter. God bless the Interwebs.

*Atlantic Fish, I don’t care if you weren’t there. I still love you.

Permalink Leave a Comment

The Meat House: Disney World for Social Foodies

September 10, 2011 at 10:41 PM (Food) (, , , , , )

A quick glance at my Foursquare feed would probably reveal at least one recent check-in at The Meat House in Coolidge Corner accompanied by “omgomgomgomnomnomnom” or some variation thereof. It’s a specialty grocery store filled with all kinds of deliciousness (including a solid beer and wine selection) and super-helpful staff – oh, and a heckuva butcher. Even better, The Meat House embraces social media to almost no end. It’s a wonder the place isn’t called Brittany Falconer Land, but I’m sure marketing is working on that.

I’ll yap about their online presence first, but then I’ll sing the praises of their good ole’ fashioned customer service. The Meat House opened in Coolidge Corner maybe about a year ago, and since then I’ve become somewhat hooked. At first I went in just to see what was up – with a name like “The Meat House,” I was bound to find something I liked. Sure enough I did, made my purchase, which came with a free package of steak tips for my first-time visit, and went on my merry way. A short time later, I saw a familiar name in my daily Groupon Email: $20 for $40 worth of fare at The Meat House. I didn’t have to think long about that one. After that, the other online channels made themselves known to me: Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare, and SCVNGR.* Finding a place with a neighborhood feel that connects with me both online and offline and offers fantastic food and service is quite the boon, and as a result The Meat House has earned a spot on my top five favourite regular places in Boston.

The Meat House: Go ahead and tell me you're not salivating, liar.I did note that the store connects both online and off. Let me tell you about the Brookline staff (I’ll drop names where I can). For starters, you will not be ignored. Within 10 seconds of entering the store, someone is going to ask you how you’re doing and if you need help finding anything. If it’s your first time visiting, you’ll be offered a quick tour (did you know you can order alligator or whatever other exotic meat you want?) and a package of The Meat House’s delicious steak tips (grill them). Need a recommendation? Ask anyone there – the entire staff is incredibly knowledgeable and more than happy to share expertise on pairings, preparation tips and anything else you may be wondering about culinarily. While The Meat House is a chain, it certainly doesn’t feel like one. When I walked in today I think at least 50 percent of the staff knew my name, and the rest recognised me at the least. Granted, I go probably twice a week, but I’m sure everyone else is treated just as warmly. Speaking of not feeling like a chain, each store is unique in stocking as much local fare as possible. I think Brookline’s store carries at least 30 percent local goods. Translation: buy delicious, and be nice to the local economy.

In addition to being able to order alligator, or venison, or ostrich, or whatever unconventional animal you enjoy consuming, if you have a hankering for a specific beer or wine, go talk to Steve. He’s responsible for the store’s alcohol content and will work with you to get your beer or wine of choice (assuming the store is already working with the distributor). I had been looking for Atwater’s Vanilla Java Porter – it’s amazing and you should be looking for it right now – for months. As far as I know, it isn’t exactly mainstream in the Boston area (but it should be). Once I spoke with Seth about it, he introduced me to Steve who checked the database and, sure enough, was able to ship some in for me. I’ve received some great treatment at Boston restaurants, but never has a grocery store gone above and beyond for me to provide me with the best experience possible.

Finally, obligatory shout-out to Jamie, the marketing person in town who, as far as I know, is responsible for the Groupons and Facebook updates. Once again, her work expands beyond the online realm. I’ve seen her in the store as well as at countless events, spreading The Meat House Gospel (often with coupons in-tow). Her job is awesome, as is she. Say hi if you see her in the store. And then tell her to do an interview with me for beyond 140. 😉

If You Go
The Meat House
1285 Beacon Street
Coolidge Corner
Brookline, MA 02446
Open Daily – Summer: 9am – 9pm

*I don’t use SCVNGR, so I don’t actually know what having a presence on the site/app does, but I still wanted to include it.

Today’s Tunes
Black Sheep, Martin Sexton

Permalink 2 Comments

Reblog: Untappd: Foursquare for Beer. Yes.

September 4, 2011 at 2:01 PM (Food) (, , , , )

This post originally appeared on my agency’s blog, RaceTalk.

If you know me personally, you can skip to the next paragraph. If not, finish this one: Hi, I’m Brittany. I love beer and location-based social media. If I found anything that married the two, I would consider marrying it.

One of the reasons why I was most excited about finally getting a smartphone – aside from no longer having to make excuses along the lines of “Sorry, my phone rides the short bus” – was all the applications and bookmarked mobile sites that would inevitably accompany it. I of course anticipated the usual suspects – Twitter, Foursquare, Angry Birds, Words with Friends – you know, all those little megabytes that have become all but staples of our livelihood. What thrilled me even more was the thought of perhaps the most magical, albeit less mainstream, mobile site to grace the lives of social beer-drinkers the digital world over: Untappd. Haven’t heard of it? Read on.

Untapped: think Foursquare for beer.

I first heard about Untappd via the Twittersphere many months ago. Being an avid consumer of beer, the prospect of being able to check into which one I was drinking sounded nothing short of incredible – especially when you go to as many beer fests as I do, and keeping track after the eighth sample can get tricky. Untappd lets you track what you’re drinking, where you’re drinking it, and what you think of it.

After that first glorious (sometimes not-so-glorious) sip, visit m.untappd.com and search for whatever it is you have in your hand. Find it – or add it – add your two cents, and check in. Simple, but that’s the beauty of it. Like many Bostonians, while I do have a few go-tos, I really love trying different brews, and I only have so much brain space dedicated to beer. Untappd is turning into my handy little Rolodex of draughts and bottles and making some recommendations at the same time based off my check-ins (although I haven’t tested that out yet – has anyone who can share their thoughts?). Like Foursquare, it also lets me keep tabs (pun unavoidable) on my beer-inclined friends to see what they’re drinking. Possibly even more fun, I earn badges (also like Foursquare) for my drinking habits, which serve no purpose other than bragging rights (and perhaps a VIP pass for an AA meeting).

Have you tried Untappd yet? Love it? Hate it? Let us know in the comments!

Permalink 2 Comments

A Note to Tavistock

September 1, 2011 at 1:45 AM (Food) (, )

Dear Tavistock,

Congrats on the purchase of Back Bay Restaurant Group, and as a result and more importantly, my beloved Atlantic Fish. A piece of advice from a regular, if I may: consult the bar manager (Joe, in case you’re not familiar) about which beers to order. I suggest this specifically in response to the revelation that my treasured watering hole now carries Beck’s.

Beck’s? Who drinks Beck’s? Joe will direct your booze budget toward something way more profitable.

Best of luck with the latest addition to the Tavistock family.

Sincerely, Brittany

Permalink Leave a Comment

Richies Pizza: A Mini Brand Loyalty Case Study

April 6, 2011 at 3:48 AM (Food, Happenings) (, , , , , )

Let me tell you a little story about seizing a sub-ideal moment in customer service and turning that into an opportunity.

I originally found Richies, a pizza (and stuff) place in Washington Square when I was moving to my current apartment. At the time, I was actually hoping to get my first taste of Publick House, but for whatever reason that magical place doesn’t believe in opening its doors during daylight hours.  Oh well.  Anyhoo, desperate for sustenance (moving oodles of possessions up four flights of stairs does that to people), we meandered into Richies.  The food did the job, and the staff was more than welcoming. When a Richies Groupon made its way into Gmail, I was happy to buy two, particularly as I had recently gone cold turkey in my battle with my Dominos addiction.

Fast-forward four months and one of my two Groupons later. Once again, I had no food in my fridge, and needed some dinner on a late Friday night.  Unable to get through on the phone, I figured I’d place an order online. Unfortunately, it didn’t look like I’d be able to use the Groupon online (weird, given it’s an online coupon, but whatever), so I resigned myself for paying full price for my pizza.  After entering my credit card information, a confirmation screen told me I’d get my order in 60-70 minutes. A bit excruciating, but I knew I’d manage.

Fast-forward two hours – and no pizza – later. Cranky and hungry, I went to bed, figuring that the website flubbed and my card wasn’t actually charged.  It was.  A bit crankier, I called Richies tonight to see about remedying the situation. And remedied it was!

I quickly (and politely – always try to be polite!) explained my dilemma. Moments later, not only did Richies promise to refund my card, but when I asked if I could just get my pizza a few days late, i.e., today, they told me “Sure, definitely.” Oh, and it would still be free.

How great is that? No back-talk, an explanation* accompanied by genuine humility, and a speedy recovery.  Had this exchange gone less pleasantly, I probably would have contacted Groupon and asked for a refund on my second (unused) coupon. Instead, I’ve been reminded of the great customer service at Richies, and even after I’ve used my final Groupon, I’ll definitely be calling them back.

*As it turned out, Richies closed early that night, but the website was still operating up until the usual closing time. The restaurant is working on syncing that all up.

Richies
1632 Beacon St.
Brookline, MA 02446
(617) 739-1114

 

Totally Unrelated Shameless Plug
This Thursday, I’ll be interviewing the one and only @BostonTweet for RaceTalk, my agency’s blog. I’ve got a few questions for him, and I’m sure you do, too.  So between now and then, tweet your questions for him using the hashtag #askbostontweet. Thanks!

Permalink 1 Comment

Next page »

%d bloggers like this: