Reblog: March 6, 2012: #AskVan! Meet Todd Van Hoosear

March 5, 2012 at 1:42 PM (Happenings) (, , , , )

This post originally appeared on RaceTalk.

Almost a year ago, we hosted our first RaceTalk tweet-sourced interview with local Twitter legend @BostonTweet. The premise was simple: we asked him a few questions, then we asked him some of yours using the hashtag #AskBostonTweet. The results were definitely interesting (and perhaps a little amusing), to say the least. Now, we’re finally bringing it back: give it up for Todd Van Hoosear (@vanhoosear)!

In addition to loving underwater basket-weaving and moonlight walks on the beach (I don’t actually know if either of those are true), Todd wears several hats: Fresh Ground Principal; Society for New Communications Research Fellow; #BUNewMedia Adjunct Professor (Terrier pride!); Social Media Club Boston Founder (@SMCBoston); Launch Camp Organizer; Publicity Club of New England VP Social Media; TEDxSomerville Planner. And no, he doesn’t sleep, as far as I know.

Given his background, if I didn’t know any better, Todd knows a thing or two about social media, so of course I’ll be asking a couple questions about that. I will also be asking him about is favorite flavor of beef jerky. I will leave the rest up to you. Between now and Tuesday, March 6, tweet questions for Todd using the hashtag #AskVan – we like to keep it simple here – and at around 8:00 p.m. that day, we’re going to ask him as many of those questions as possible in front of a live studio audience. I mean his New Media & PR class at Boston University.

Got a question for @vanhoosear? Tweet using #AskVan between now and Tuesday night!

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Russell House Tavern and Brasserie JO on Social: “You’re Doing It Right!”

February 19, 2012 at 3:00 PM (Customer Service, Food) (, , , , , )

Newsflash: I love and live on food, and I love and live on social. I hope you were sitting down for that, because I know it’s shocking. So naturally when I find fantastic eateries who are using social media beyond just tweeting what the daily specials are on occasion, I try to make a point of going back… again, and again, and again.

You're doing it wrong failGiven my 160-character background, it’s a sad sight when I see one of my watering holes or favourite brands join Twitter or Facebook and not use it to interact with fans or followers, choosing instead to use social as another one-way push platform. Luckily, I know of two wonderful establishments who do no such thing. Ladies and gentlemen, give it up for Harvard Square’s Russell House Tavern and Back Bay’s Brasserie JO.

One of my first visits to Russell House Tavern (@RussellHouseTav) was a result of my having a little time to kill and having tweeted with their chef, Michael Scelfo, once or twice previously. As I’m wont to do, I checked in via Foursquare and probably tweeted something about the incredible breadth of the beer list to both RHT and Scelfo. After a brief back and forth on the Twitter Tubes, I had the privilege to meet the chef himself (and sample some delicious sea bass) in-person. I don’t know if it’s just me, but meeting the folks responsible for spoiling my palate has always been a thrill. I’ve only met a handful in Boston, and 1.) it makes me feel important and appreciated, and 2.) I just like knowing the personality that goes into a menu. I’m a people person. What do you expect?

Russell House Tavern downstairs bar Boston CambridgeScelfo is definitely the heart of RHT, but there’s much more that contributes to my love of the place: the layout, the atmosphere, the management, and the bar staff (I’m sure the waitstaff is also wonderful, but I’ve never dined away from the bar). On more recent visits, I’ve met the folks behind the Twitter handle (specifically Tyler Titherington – lovely meeting you!) and learned to trust the beer recommendations from bartenders Adam and Lou (you have to ask because the variety on the menu will, in fact, blow your mind).

I’ve also learned that you can’t lose with anything on the menu, having tried something new every visit and never being disappointed. Recent highlights: beef heart ravioli, burrata salad (the first time I ate my brussel sprouts!), bacon-wrapped paté, foie custard, and ox tongue meatballs. In short, Scelfo can do no wrong. This all said, I don’t think I ever would have visited unprompted if that online rapport wasn’t there, first. I’m not entirely a creature of habit, but I need a reason to try something new: a friend’s recommendation, an event, or even just an invitation to visit from a restaurant’s Twitter account – which leads me to my next social shout-out.

Brasserie JO (@brasseriejo) was actually the first restaurant I visited in Boston several years ago when I was still looking at colleges. Goodness, that was a while ago – so long ago that Twitter was still a lower-cased verb – but it was still a tasty experience (if you’re ever there for brunch, try the chocolate French toast). Fast-forward to when checking in on Foursquare is almost on par with breathing when it comes to my natural instincts. I had just done so at the Prudential Center (check in and, yes, continue breathing) when I received at at-reply from JO, suggesting that I stop in because it came @BostonTweet– and @eric_andersen-recommended – adding an #IWithThatWereTrue tag to signify the jest behind the latter end of the statement. I appreciated the chutzpah, and given that I didn’t have any concrete plans, I decided to oblige and swing in for a beer (and maybe some escargot).

After a few minutes at the bar and feeling a little cheeky, I tweeted back to them saying, “I’m here – where are you?” While whomever was responsible for the Twitter account wasn’t there, he or she did inform management that I was in the house, and I did get to meet some of the kitchen magic as well as one of the managers (sadly this was several months ago, so names have escaped me – this kudos is LONG overdue and I apologise). Oh, and I was also introduced to a divine charcuterie plate, but that relationship didn’t last long – relationships with fine cuisine rarely do.

Thanks to social, I’ve turned into one of those annoying consumers who gets cranky when brands on social don’t interact (see the beginning of this post). When a restaurant invites me in, and then rewards me for doing so, then yes, I’ll be more inclined to return. In fact, I’m pretty sure JO was the restaurant of choice during the following visit from the parentals – and again, one of the managers (I remember that time it was Annmarie Blythe) stopped by to say hello. “Getting a Twitter” just doesn’t cut it for B2C brands. Thankfully there are some great establishments in and around Boston who recognize that, and those of us who live online certainly aren’t going to ignore that when it comes time to make a purchasing decision.

Have you had an amazing experience with a local eatery, thanks to social? Let me know in the comments so I can check it out (let me know where the crappy experiences were so I can avoid those, too).

If You Go…

Russell House Tavern
14 JFK Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 500-3055
http://www.russellhousecambridge.com/

Brasserie JO
120 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 425-3240
http://www.brasseriejo.com/

Today’s Tunes
“Delicate,” Damien Rice
“Amie,” Damien Rice
“9 Crimes,” Damien Rice
“Dressed to Kill,” Landon Pigg

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Reblog: Brands on Social Can’t Ignore Social Engagement

January 25, 2012 at 9:00 AM (Customer Service) (, , , , )

This post originally appeared on my agency’s blog, RaceTalk.

A recent compilation of research on eMarketer shared that – surprise! – people don’t like being ignored by brands on social media. I mean, people don’t like being ignored in general, but when it comes to business-to-consumer offenses online, it can have some noteworthy repercussions: research firm Conversocial found that more than a quarter of survey respondents would no longer do business with a brand if their questions went unanswered on Facebook or Twitter. And let’s not forget the ripple effect: only 11.7 percent of survey participants said they wouldn’t care if they saw other user questions ignored online. Almost half said they would be far less likely to buy anything from that brand in the future, and the remainder said they would think twice (but recognized that there are other factors to consider).

eMarketer research

That’s a big angry chunk of the pie. I know that I’ve had both positive and negative experiences with brands on social media that continue to influence my willingness to give them my money. And yes, some of those negative experiences have been when I had a problem and no one on the brand side ever acknowledged it (*cough*cough*Southwest Airlines*cough*cough*). While I’m a huge advocate for brands being on social media, they need to know that “getting a Twitter” just isn’t going to cut it. Once you go social, you need to be social; there’s no private office to hide from customers. While it’s not possible to respond to all feedback, questions and complaints merit timely acknowledgements – even if it’s a request to redirect the conversation to another, more manageable channel. Otherwise, it becomes worse than being on-hold for 20 minutes, because at least there, it’s initially a private frustration – until the angry customer blogs about it later, anyway, but that’s another story.

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Reblog: Google Sneaks Social into Search

January 24, 2012 at 9:00 AM (Happenings) (, , , )

This post originally appeared on my agency’s blog, RaceTalk.

How’s that for alliteration? This week, Google began incorporating Google+ content into search results naming it Search Plus Your World – poetic, I know. Said Amit Singhal, a Google fellow who oversees search: “What you search today is largely written by people you don’t know; we call that the faceless Web. Search Plus Your World transforms search and centers it around you.’’

I’m not sure I like this idea. When I want to find my friends and their content, I’m going to go to the online source, be it their blog, YouTube page, Google+ profile (rare as that may be), or Facebook page. When I go to Google, I want the faceless Web. I want Google to provide me with searches that are as unbiased as possible, with most relevant/popular links showing up first – not some exchange I had with my second cousin on Google+. A real-life example: I like to periodically Google my name to see where I stand in the World Wide Web. Which blog posts come up, tweets, event attendee lists, competitive ballroom dance results and convicted doppelgangers are going to make their way to Page One (and yes, all of those things have been or are on Page One)? Today, I saw a whole bunch of my own posts via Google+. Not exactly useful to me.

Google did say that Google users will be able to toggle between integrated posts, just personal posts and just standard, but unless Google suddenly gets access to Facebook content and can cache the entire social web in search results (which will likely never happen, because why would Facebook and Google cooperate, and if they did, how much of  a privacy fit would that cause?), I still don’t see the point.

What do you think of Google social integrating with Google search? Good? Bad? Huh?

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January Networking Events: Where Will You Be?

January 2, 2012 at 4:10 PM (Events) (, , , , , )

We all (should) know by now how much I love talking to strangers about public relations and the like, and what better way to do that than via industry networking events? Below is a rudimentary list of goings-on this month that I’d consider attending. For some reason I don’t hear about most events until a few days beforehand, so if you know of any others, send them my way and I’ll see about adding them here.

Beantown Social, January 16 – Boston
http://www.eventbrite.com/event/2536095530/esearch?srnk=8
A free mix-and-mingle for social media folks at Sonsie, in Boston’s Back Bay. 21+. UPDATE: This event is booked, but there’s a waiting list. Who knows? If I don’t go maybe you’ll get my ticket.

Bruins Pre-game Meet-up, January 19 – Boston
http://bit.ly/xwQw1F
The Social Media Club of Boston and LPP are partnering up at the Greatest Bar for a little pre-game networking in advance of the Bruins/Devils game. Go B’s!

Boston Media Makers at NIGHT, January 22 – Boston
http://bostonmediamakersatnight2012.eventbrite.com/
Back at Sonsie for some schmoozing, pizza, and an optional regifting-tastic Yankee Swap extravaganza.

BostInno Meet Up, January 24 – Boston
https://www.eventbrite.com/register?orderid=64380364403&ebtv=C&eid=2557144488&client_token=noqueue
Like beer, networking and BostInno? Of course you do. Swing by, rub some elbows and have a good time.

Boston’s Media Best, January 24 – Boston
http://www.pubclub.org/upcoming-programs
Details TBA from the Publicity Club of New England.

3rd Annual #MegaTweetup, January 24 – Cambridge
http://megatweetup3.eventbrite.com/
A tweet-up celebrating tweet-ups. This thing is probably going to be monstrous, taking place at the Microsoft NERD Center.

How to Use Rich Media to Create Winning Campaigns, January 24 – Cambridge
http://prsaboston.org/meetinginfo.php?id=10&ts=1324659383
Head over to the Microsoft NERD Center to hear about how important it is to liven up content with media to tell a compelling story, courtesy of PRSA.

Where will you be this month?

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The Meat House: Disney World for Social Foodies

September 10, 2011 at 10:41 PM (Food) (, , , , , )

A quick glance at my Foursquare feed would probably reveal at least one recent check-in at The Meat House in Coolidge Corner accompanied by “omgomgomgomnomnomnom” or some variation thereof. It’s a specialty grocery store filled with all kinds of deliciousness (including a solid beer and wine selection) and super-helpful staff – oh, and a heckuva butcher. Even better, The Meat House embraces social media to almost no end. It’s a wonder the place isn’t called Brittany Falconer Land, but I’m sure marketing is working on that.

I’ll yap about their online presence first, but then I’ll sing the praises of their good ole’ fashioned customer service. The Meat House opened in Coolidge Corner maybe about a year ago, and since then I’ve become somewhat hooked. At first I went in just to see what was up – with a name like “The Meat House,” I was bound to find something I liked. Sure enough I did, made my purchase, which came with a free package of steak tips for my first-time visit, and went on my merry way. A short time later, I saw a familiar name in my daily Groupon Email: $20 for $40 worth of fare at The Meat House. I didn’t have to think long about that one. After that, the other online channels made themselves known to me: Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare, and SCVNGR.* Finding a place with a neighborhood feel that connects with me both online and offline and offers fantastic food and service is quite the boon, and as a result The Meat House has earned a spot on my top five favourite regular places in Boston.

The Meat House: Go ahead and tell me you're not salivating, liar.I did note that the store connects both online and off. Let me tell you about the Brookline staff (I’ll drop names where I can). For starters, you will not be ignored. Within 10 seconds of entering the store, someone is going to ask you how you’re doing and if you need help finding anything. If it’s your first time visiting, you’ll be offered a quick tour (did you know you can order alligator or whatever other exotic meat you want?) and a package of The Meat House’s delicious steak tips (grill them). Need a recommendation? Ask anyone there – the entire staff is incredibly knowledgeable and more than happy to share expertise on pairings, preparation tips and anything else you may be wondering about culinarily. While The Meat House is a chain, it certainly doesn’t feel like one. When I walked in today I think at least 50 percent of the staff knew my name, and the rest recognised me at the least. Granted, I go probably twice a week, but I’m sure everyone else is treated just as warmly. Speaking of not feeling like a chain, each store is unique in stocking as much local fare as possible. I think Brookline’s store carries at least 30 percent local goods. Translation: buy delicious, and be nice to the local economy.

In addition to being able to order alligator, or venison, or ostrich, or whatever unconventional animal you enjoy consuming, if you have a hankering for a specific beer or wine, go talk to Steve. He’s responsible for the store’s alcohol content and will work with you to get your beer or wine of choice (assuming the store is already working with the distributor). I had been looking for Atwater’s Vanilla Java Porter – it’s amazing and you should be looking for it right now – for months. As far as I know, it isn’t exactly mainstream in the Boston area (but it should be). Once I spoke with Seth about it, he introduced me to Steve who checked the database and, sure enough, was able to ship some in for me. I’ve received some great treatment at Boston restaurants, but never has a grocery store gone above and beyond for me to provide me with the best experience possible.

Finally, obligatory shout-out to Jamie, the marketing person in town who, as far as I know, is responsible for the Groupons and Facebook updates. Once again, her work expands beyond the online realm. I’ve seen her in the store as well as at countless events, spreading The Meat House Gospel (often with coupons in-tow). Her job is awesome, as is she. Say hi if you see her in the store. And then tell her to do an interview with me for beyond 140. 😉

If You Go
The Meat House
1285 Beacon Street
Coolidge Corner
Brookline, MA 02446
Open Daily – Summer: 9am – 9pm

*I don’t use SCVNGR, so I don’t actually know what having a presence on the site/app does, but I still wanted to include it.

Today’s Tunes
Black Sheep, Martin Sexton

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Grooveshark, Pandora and Turntable . . . Oh, Spotify!

August 6, 2011 at 11:51 PM (Musings) (, , , , , , , )

Assuming you don’t live under a rock without WiFi access, chances are you recognize at least one of the web-based music services listed above. Initially, I felt overwhelmed with options, feeling obligated to choose the “best” of the bunch, but it didn’t take long for me to figure out that a) the Interwebs wasn’t holding a gun to my head or a contract to sign with blood b) all four serve different purposes for me to determine as and when I see fit. Curious? You should be, if you’re still bothering to read this:

Pandora
The beginning of it all, as far as I can recall (and the source of tonight’s tunes, below). Pandora is great when you don’t feel like handpicking your playlists, or want to find some new tunes. For instance, this afternoon I felt Jamiroquai-ish, but my knowledge of anything remotely similar is just shy of nonexistent. I don’t even know how to try and describe the genre. Solution: punch “Virtual Insanity” into Pandora and enjoy the resulting playlist. The major downsides for me are the commercials and the skipping limit (particularly when the station is getting really out of whack). While I don’t use it that often, I know that other folks regularly run up against the allotted playtime with the free membership, which can be a heckuva downer toward the end of the month.

Grooveshark
Grooveshark also has a radio offering, but unless you have a bunch of songs in mind, it takes a while to calibrate to what you like. That said, there is no limit to song-skipping, and no commercials. Win! I haven’t tried it, but I’ve heard you can also upload content, which is pretty nifty. Grooveshark is my go-to when I want to listen to top 500 – yes, they have a pre-made playlist with the 500 most-played songs on Grooveshark, and you can listen to them in any order. You can also tailor the playlist, adding and deleting whatever you like. Downside: no Beatles. At all.

Spotify
Think iTunes, without having to buy any of the songs – and being able to link up with your Facebook friends’ Spotify lists. That said, if you want to play the songs without an internet connection or commercials, you have to pay for the membership (What is it with these people wanting my money? Don’t they understand how important my beer budget is?), but the commercials are much less frequent than Pandora; sometimes they even recommend public/ promoted playlists that I find interesting, so the targeting is pretty solid. Other pluses include a desktop client with a very nice user interface, which means no extra tabs to keep open, and the fact that my Klout score was high enough to merit an invite during the limited release. Yes, I am susceptible to ego boosts. Sue me. Downside: no radio option that I’ve discovered as of yet.

Turntable.fm
Turntable.fm is definitely the odd duckling of this collection. I really only use it on Friday afternoon at work with my coworkers for an eclectic jam session. It’s a social DJ platform where users can enter different “rooms” and tune in or, if there’s an open turntable (there are five to a room), spin some of their own. Other people in the same room can rank each tune as “lame” or “rock on,” earning the DJ who selected the song points that can go toward an avatar (or maybe something else, but again, I don’t spend too much time on the site). In addition, each room has a chat bar where listeners can comment and make suggestions. It’s a good time, but unless it’s a Friday afternoon, there’s too much unpredictability for my tastes.

What are your thoughts on the internet radio world? Pros? Cons? Don’t give a rat’s posterior? Let me know.

Tonight’s Tunes
“Secret,” Maroon 5
“Nobody,” Kate Earl
“Around the World,” Daft Punk
“Dance with Me” (ft. Treysongz), Kevin Lyttle
“Heaven Sent You,” Howard Hewett

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In the Event You Are Sending Me a Résumé . . .

August 4, 2011 at 1:57 AM (Musings, work) (, , , , , )

It’s been over 100 days since I blogged. I know, because LinkedIn reminds me every time I log in. It’s frustrating, and a little embarrassing. Given how many hours I spend looking at a computer daily, it’s easy for me to justify not wanting to spend any more time at one once I get home, but that’s no reason to be unable to post something at least once a week. So let’s try getting back to that again, shall we?

In addition to being uber busy, work at Racepoint has been great. Lots of media, writing, tweeting – you know, all that stuff that falls into an agency job description. What I didn’t expect was all the job inquiries I’ve been fielding. Don’t get me wrong, whenever I shout to BU that we’re hiring, I fully anticipate a handful of candidates recommended by my qualified friends over there. But now, there’s a new breed of job candidate I’m seeing: random internet people.</ominousmusic>

As a PR agency, we’re hiring about every 15 minutes or so, and what better way to fish for candidates who need to be social media-savvy than by fishing through social media? That’s right, I tweet job openings. Shamelessly. And often. The upside is that I get a lot of responses. The bad news is that those responses are not filtered. Whereas I knew my BU friends would never send me a lemon, on Twitter, I have no idea who’s going to be in each box of job-seeking chocolates. While there’s really no point in going into details on each #fail, I figured I’d share a couple things I’ve noticed on this short journey as an amateur recruiter. In the event you are sending me a résumé . . .

Spell my name right. Really. You want me to bother sending your information to the person who is actually responsible for calling you? Make sure you don’t mistake me for a Britney. Or Britany. Or Britanny. Or . . . oh, God. My fingers are starting to bleed just typing these.

That goes for my company, too. Do a Google search on my company. We exist. Racepoint Group. Not Race Point Group. Or The Racepoint Group. Crap, there go my fingers again.

Keep your resume to one page – and current. Unless you are detailing how you changed Poland’s opinion of Hitler through social media efforts – and, in that case, I’m not sure I want to work with you – there is no reason why your résumé should spill over a page. I have no problem reading 10pt font, and I’m pretty sure most HR folks accept that, too. Still running out of room? Maybe you should cut “Starbucks barista.” Unless you’re applying for a corporate Starbucks position, I suppose. Also, if you’re sending me a résumé in August 2011, I had better not see “Graduation expected May 2011.”

Follow directions. I hate cover letters. I sent out so many generic ones when I was job-hunting, but my best responses came from people to whom I’d just sent short, unrehearsed notes. Ability to smell fear? This is an example of a fun fact. Another one might be that you're an expert no-handed cartwheeler. Or that you like ducks.We all learned how to write a form cover letter in college, so we can all pick them out. You’re fooling no one. Thus, rather than asking random job candidates to send me their résumé and a letter of intent, I ask for the résumé and some fun facts. I don’t need a whole paragraph about how you spent a year in Zimbabwe building huts, but a bullet point would be good to know. I can always ask you about it later. Don’t have any fun facts to share? That’s okay, I guess (although you may want to seek work in a less fun environment), but please don’t ignore my request with a canned cover letter. If you do, I can assure you that I will not be sending you along to our recruiter.

I know, you learned about this at every single career panel you ever attended, but somehow, I still see these errors. I can only imagine what full-time recruiters receive, and my heart goes out to each and every one of them. What are some of the doozies you’ve encountered on the receiving end of job inquiries? Go ahead, make me feel like I shouldn’t be whining.

Tonight’s Tunes
“Virtual Insanity,” Jamiroquai
“September,” Earth, Wind & Fire
“Dancing Machine,” Jackson 5
“Canned Heat,” Jamiroquai
“Lady (Hear Me Tonight)” Modjo
“When I Get You Alone,” Robin Thicke

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Ages Later . . . #AskBostonTweet Lives!

April 21, 2011 at 2:36 AM (Happenings) (, , , , , , , )

Remember that post I had stickied to my blog not too long ago, asking you very nicely to tweet your questions for @BostonTweet using the hashtag #AskBostonTweet? Well, you did tweet your questions, and Tom O’Keefe/ @BostonTweet was nice enough to to answer most of them – I would have asked all of them, but Twitter ate a couple.

The official video for RaceTalk is included below, but stay tuned for the director’s cuts, which will include bloopers (mostly me laughing hysterically and losing my place) and the questions that weren’t included on the agency blog. Enjoy!

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Now’s Your Chance to #AskBostonTweet

April 4, 2011 at 7:51 AM (Happenings) (, , , , , , )

I recently started writing for my agency‘s blog, RaceTalk. Following my first post not too long ago, I eagerly sent my mother a link to show her that yes, my college degree wasn’t going to waste. She Emailed me a short while later to say that she learned a lot from my post, and oh, by the way, she found a typo.

Thanks, Mom!

I haven’t been discouraged from contributing to RaceTalk, though. Rather, I figured I’d just work around my flawed typographical skills, and switch to a new media platform: video. Onto the meat of this post.

Many of you who read my blog are active on Twitter, or are at least familiar with it. Either way, there’s a good chance you’ve heard of Tom O’Keefe, or more likely his Twitter persona, @BostonTweet.

BostonTweet was created […] as a way to create awareness for local business in a down economy.Got questions for @BostonTweet? Tweet 'em to #AskBostonTweet! Tom developed BostonTweet in November 2008 when the financial markets were at a precipitous decline and his two former startups had become worthless after the crash. Fearing that Boston would become a 1929 ghost town, O’Keefe created BostonTweet to make sure everyone knew that our favorite restaurants and bars were still open and needed our business for survival. Needing a very economical platform to promote local business, Twitter was hands down the best application to talk about everything Boston.
— Gotta love “About” pages, right?

Anyhoo, over the last couple of years, @BostonTweet has developed into somewhat of a hyper-local Twitterlebrity, with almost 30,000 folks following him on Twitter for updates on Boston goings-on, including special events, Boston city-living, food and drink deals, burritos, and his whereabouts. While we have oodles of social media gurus telling us how businesses can benefit from social media, we’ve got a guy in Boston who is demonstrating it before our very eyes.

Now, if you’re at all like me, you may have a couple of questions for this guy: how was the idea of @BostonTweet conceived (why not Facebook, or a blog or forum), and what made it take off the way it did? Can a man truly live on burritos and beer alone? What’s next for social media-fueled citizen journalism? And seriously, what’s with the burritos?

I have wonderful news for you: the man, myth and legend behind BostonTweet has agreed to a video interview (see, there was a point to the beginning of this post) on Thursday evening, April 7. Between now and then, tweet your questions for BostonTweet using the hashtag #AskBostonTweet. We’ll pick out a few gems to answer on Thursday evening, then post his answers to your questions – and a couple of mine – on Friday, April 8. Start tweeting!

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